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Video 1 - Fearful of changing valuesVideo 1 - Fearful of changing values
Video - Fearful of changing values - Many Canadians think their fundamental values are under pressure because of some people coming to Canada. How do you address concerns, without being seen as being intolerant of others? This challenge encourages Canadians to look at values and changes from a different perspective.
 
Video 2 of the Top Ten Challenges At Work Series - People speaking different languages at workVideo 2 of the Top Ten Challenges At Work Series - People speaking different languages at work
Video - People speaking different languages at work - People speaking different languages at work can be one of the most contentious issues to address. If you want to avoid insult, indignation (even banner headlines) consider simple and common sense approaches to handle this sometimes, delicate issue. This is a free video available to clients. Inquire with Stephen Hammond on how to gain access.
 
Video 3 of the Top Ten Challenges At Work Series - Concern of actually speaking about culture, race, religion, etc. for fear this will be seen as bigotedVideo 3 of the Top Ten Challenges At Work Series - Concern of actually speaking about culture, race, religion, etc. for fear this will be seen as bigoted
Video - Concern of actually speaking about culture, race, religion, etc. for fear this will be seen as bigoted Canada is home to people from all over the world. We come from different cultures, and religions (or none at all) and we have various colours of skin. Instead of being afraid to discuss these differences, find sensible ways when and how these differences can be addressed. This is a free video available to clients. Inquire with Stephen Hammond on how to gain free access to it.
 
Video 4 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Hiring a “different” person and if things go wrong, they can’t correct, discipline, or fire them, for fear of the employee going to the human rights commissionVideo 4 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Hiring a “different” person and if things go wrong, they can’t correct, discipline, or fire them, for fear of the employee going to the human rights commission
Video - Hiring a “different” person and if things go wrong, they can’t correct, discipline, or fire them, for fear of the employee going to the human rights commission. So many Canadians are “different” that it shouldn’t matter. Unfortunately, discrimination still exists for persons who are different from the grandparents of many Canadians. Find ways to ensure your workplace isn’t adding to that discrimination and instead is addressing it.
 
Video 5 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Not hiring women for fear they will go on parental leave.Video 5 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Not hiring women for fear they will go on parental leave.
Video - Not hiring women for fear they will go on parental leave. One of the biggest areas of discrimination against women in the workplace relates to women having children, or the mere chance a woman may have children. You can find ways to address this issue and to ensure women and men are given the same opportunities, regardless of parental status.
 
Video 6 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Fear of not knowing how to respond to an insensitive comment or conduct at work (supervisors and managers won’t know what to do because they aren’t experts in human rights)Video 6 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Fear of not knowing how to respond to an insensitive comment or conduct at work (supervisors and managers won’t know what to do because they aren’t experts in human rights)
Video - Fear of not knowing how to respond to an insensitive comment or conduct at work (supervisors and managers won’t know what to do because they aren’t experts in human rights). Workplace human rights issues pop up everywhere. Sometimes they’re subtle. Other times not so subtle. Supervisors and others in the workplace don’t have to be experts in human rights to address these issues. In fact, relying on common sense will go a long way.
 
Video 7 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - When an employee meets with some discrimination, this employee wants someone fired (for example) and the employer doesn’t think firing is a reasonable responseVideo 7 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - When an employee meets with some discrimination, this employee wants someone fired (for example) and the employer doesn’t think firing is a reasonable response
Video - When an employee meets with some discrimination, this employee wants someone fired (for example) and the employer doesn’t think firing is a reasonable response. Many employers face the dilemma of protecting an employee who is discriminated or harassed while ensuring any “punishment” is done within reason and the law. Sometimes it’s a balancing act and not an easy one. If an employee thinks there should be more severe discipline, consider some common sense approaches that might help.
 
Video 8 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Getting leaders and employees throughout the organization to effectively and simply, deal with inappropriate comments as they arise. i.e. getting people to stick their necks out.Video 8 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Getting leaders and employees throughout the organization to effectively and simply, deal with inappropriate comments as they arise. i.e. getting people to stick their necks out.
Video - Getting leaders and employees throughout the organization to effectively and simply, deal with inappropriate comments as they arise. i.e. getting people to stick their necks out. If you have a workplace where employees feel comfortable to speak up and resolve issues on their own, then you’re ahead of most places where people fear sticking their necks out. Consider some approaches that can help to get everyone to address conflict and speak their mind…respectfully.
 
Video 9 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Understanding the need to “accommodate” employees when the law requires an employer to do soVideo 9 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Understanding the need to “accommodate” employees when the law requires an employer to do so
Video - Understanding the need to “accommodate” employees when the law requires an employer to do so The “duty to accommodate” is one of the most difficult areas of human rights and employment law, not just because it can be complex, but because it grates against many people’s ideals of “one rule for all”. Yet most circumstances won’t be complex at all and a bit of understanding and education goes a long way.
 
Ten Video Kit: The top ten challenges at workTen Video Kit: The top ten challenges at work
There are many workplace challenges facing Canadians. From observations while working in the field of workplace and community human rights over many years, Stephen Hammond has chosen what he considers the top 10. These videos are intended to start a dialogue. Have a discussion, and try to come to resolutions that can be helpful to your group. The best way to deal with workplace challenges is to talk about them in a respectful way.
 
Video 10 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Knowing that similar words or actions can have a different impact on people at work Video 10 of the Top Ten Challenges at Work Series - Knowing that similar words or actions can have a different impact on people at work
Video - Knowing that similar words or actions can have a different impact on people at work. If you like the idea of acknowledging and at times, celebrating our differences, then why do some differences get us into trouble? Often people will look at things in different ways at work and that can cause problems. Do you have to avoid “sex, politics and religion”? Find out how differences can be resolved. This video is free to clients. Inquire with Stephen Hammond to learn how you can gain access to this free video.